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My 20-20 vision: A virtual exhibition

In January this year, I had a short exhibition called My 20:20 Vision at St Andrew’s Arts Centre in Gravesend. It featured quite a bit of new work, including some painting, which I hadn’t done for a long time. Many of the pictures were loosely based on memories of growing up in the Gravesend Riverarea. I sold a bit and it was lovely to see everybody who came.

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Unfortunately, my 20:20 vision didn’t extend to predicting COVID-19 and the devastating effect that is having on everyone.

I’m in a high risk group for health reasons and find myself confined to barracks. Three follow-on exhibitions I planned at The Hot Tin https://www.the-hot-tin.co.uk/ Iron Pier Brewery https://www.ironpier.beer/ and Cafe No.84 https://www.no84.co.uk/ had to be cancelled so I thought I’d do a virtual exhibition on here for a bit.

BTW if you live locally, Iron Pier are providing a take away service to keep us all going while the taproom is shut. You can find out more on their Facebook site.

Anyway, enjoy the virtual exhibition. There is a bit of blurb and information about size, medium and price of all the pictures featured in the video below, with links to my gallery www.duncangrantartist.com/shop/ where you will find many, many more pictures!


The music for the video was composed by talented musician and friend Ian Kirton. He has recently been writing some tracks exclusively for Audiojungle and this is one of them. It is available to license for media projects here https://audiojungle.net/item/relaxed-friendly-inspiring-acoustic-guitar/25685439

Details of artwork in the video
You can see all my latest work, which featured in My 20:20 vision exhibition, here https://duncangrantartist.com/product-category/new-artwork/

Road and Power Lines
I’ve always liked roads heading off into the distance. I think it’s the idea of a journey and of things yet to come. I often place man-made artefacts into my art. I think it adds to the story.
Acrylic on stretched canvas
70cm X 50cm
£140
https://duncangrantartist.com/product/road-and-power-lines/

A4 digital print also available
https://duncangrantartist.com/product/road-and-power-lines-print/ 

Across the Estuary
This is the view down to the Thames from the higher chalk land on the foot slopes of the North Downs. My old stomping ground as a callow youth.
Acrylic on stretched canvas
70cm X 50cm
£140
https://duncangrantartist.com/product/across-the-estuary/

A4 digital print also available
https://duncangrantartist.com/product/across-the-estuary-print/

 

Fifty Trees
This paining is inspired by a childhood memory of walking and cycling past this row of poplars between Higham and Cliffe in Kent. Those trees are still there today.

Acrylic on stretched canvas
70cm X 50cm
£175
https://duncangrantartist.com/product/fifty-trees/

A4 digital print also available
https://duncangrantartist.com/product/fifty-trees-print/

Crows on the Field
I like the lines that fields and trees make. There is a sort of bleak beauty about winter fields.
Acrylic on stretched canvas
40cm X 40cm
£90
https://duncangrantartist.com/product/crows-on-the-field/

A4 digital print also available
https://duncangrantartist.com/product/crows-on-the-field-print/


Migraine

Ever since my serious illness, I get really bad dreams…..I’m glad when I wake up.
Acrylic on stretched canvas
40cm X 40cm
£100
https://duncangrantartist.com/product/migraine/

A4 digital print also available
https://duncangrantartist.com/product/migraine-print/

 

Happy Easter
Just a little head pattern inspired by the mysterious stone sculptures of Easter Island
Ink on A4 acid-free paper
£120
https://duncangrantartist.com/product/happy-easter/

A4 digital print also available
https://duncangrantartist.com/product/happy-easter-print/

 

In a line
Populating Smalltown. Just seeing how people and movement can be applied with a few simple marks.
Ink on A4 acid-free paper
£120
https://duncangrantartist.com/product/in-a-line/

A4 digital print also available
https://duncangrantartist.com/product/in-a-line-copy/

 

Ferry
Just my impression of people on a crowded ferry. Nowhere in particular. Maybe Tilbury, Galicia or Greece.
Ink on A4 acid-free paper
£120
https://duncangrantartist.com/product/ferry/

A4 digital print also available
https://duncangrantartist.com/product/ferry-print/

Winter Haze
As a child, I remember cement dust everywhere around the local cement works. In this picture I was trying to capture that grey, dusty environment.
Acrylic on stretched canvas
30cm X 40cm
£90
https://duncangrantartist.com/product/winter-haze/

A4 digital print also available
https://duncangrantartist.com/product/winter-haze-print/

 

 

Lower Hope 2
This is the stretch of the Thames below Gravesend where I spent many a day as a boy fishing and having bonfires.
Acrylic on stretched canvas
40cm X 30cm
£90
https://duncangrantartist.com/product/lower-hope-2/

A4 digital print also available
https://duncangrantartist.com/product/lower-hope-2-print/

Cliff at Sunset

The chalk cliffs in Kent and Sussex always impress me when I’m lucky enough to see them.
Ink on A4 acid-free paper
£120
https://duncangrantartist.com/product/cliff-at-sunset/

A4 digital print also available
https://duncangrantartist.com/product/cliff-at-sunset-print/

 

White Cliffs
I studied Geology and it was these impressive formations, made up of billions of dead sea creatures, that started my interest in the subject.
Acrylic on stretched canvas
50cm X 40cm
£125
https://duncangrantartist.com/product/white-cliffs/

A4 digital print also available
https://duncangrantartist.com/product/white-cliffs-print/

Under the Pylon
The 400kv Thames Crossing is an overhead powerline crossing the River Thames, between Botany Marshes in Swanscombe in Kent and West Thurrock in Essex. Its towers are the tallest electricity pylons in the UK.
Ink on A4 acid-free paper
£120
https://duncangrantartist.com/product/under-the-pylon/

A4 digital print also available
https://duncangrantartist.com/product/under-the-pylon-print/

 

 

Salt Flats
This drawing is inspired by a childhood memory of fishing and messing about by the Thames down river from Gravesend, Kent.
Ink on A4 acid-free paper
£120
https://duncangrantartist.com/product/salt-flats/

A4 digital print also available
https://duncangrantartist.com/product/salt-flats-print/

Red Sky
Chimneys were on every horizon in my childhood and, to be honest, I like drawing them and the have become a recurring theme in my art.
Ink on A4 acid-free paper
£120
https://duncangrantartist.com/product/red-sky/

A4 digital print also available
https://duncangrantartist.com/product/red-sky-print/

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Luna Zsigo: Capturing emotional landscapes

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Those of you that know me or who have been following me here or on social media, know that my day job (or more often my night job) is in construction on the roads. This involves a lot of time sitting in my van waiting for things to happen, and during that time, I doodle. I also doodle when I’m watching TV or listening to music. My Small Towns , for example start from a horizon line and I build out from that. In other ink drawings I’ll start with a ‘object’, say a mushroom or a shell, and expand the picture from there, never really knowing how the picture will turn out until it is finished.

Chatham-based artist Luna Zsigo describes doodling as a kind of ‘automatic drawing’. This is an approach to art that she, and many other artists before her have used as a starting point or creative stimulus for their art.

The key principle of automatic art is that the artist starts work with no preconceived idea of what the finished product will look like. Rather, the final artwork is inspired by dreams or emerges from the subconscious. The surrealists famously borrowed Sigmund Freud’s automatic drawing and writing techniques, which he used as psychoanalytic tools, to stimulate their art. They believed that creativity from deep within the subconscious was more powerful and authentic than that arising from conscious thought. They were also interested in dreams as expressions of unconscious feelings and desires.

Andre Masson automatic drawing
MoMA Andre Masson: Automatic drawing

MoMa (New York)  cites the work of French artist of Andre Masson (1896-1987) as examples of this approach to art.

[Masson] began automatic drawings with no preconceived subject or composition in mind. Like a medium channelling a spirit, he let his pen travel rapidly across the paper without conscious control. He soon found hints of images—fragmented bodies and objects—emerging from the abstract, lacelike web of pen marks. At times Masson elaborated on these with conscious changes or additions, but he left the traces of the rapidly drawn ink mostly intact.

Various forms of automatic art were also developed by other artists, e.g. Max Ernst  (surrealist collage, frottagegrattage) and Joan Miro. Later automatism played some part in the abstract expressionism of Jackson Pollock and others. Today it continues to inspire artists and over the past year has been a major influence for the artwork of Luna Zsigo.

After many years travelling and raising her family, Luna trained, as a mature student, in Art and Design at University for the Creative Arts in Rochester (whose alumni include Zandra Rhodes, Tracy Emin and Karen Millen). After graduating, Luna worked for eight years supporting students with disabilities to complete their creative studies. She now works as a freelance artist and has been re-employed by the university’s outreach department as a creative workshop tutor.

After leaving Art School, Luna’s early work focused on traditional portraiture, layering oil paint and glazes. ‘I’d always seen myself as a portrait painter and after college I went back to my comfort zone,’ she remembers. ‘I felt that I needed to prove to myself that I could still paint.’

While studying at University, Luna was inspired the glass work of Daniela Schoenbaechler. https://danielaschoenbaechler.com/work  She began painting quick acrylic portraits on acetate, fixing them to windows and photographing them against the dark skies. ‘Through this experimentation I found, interesting things beginning to happen in the negative space, where there was no paint,’ she explains. ‘Things would emerge, images I wasn’t expecting. It was as if I was looking beyond the physical self and into the emotional being, between the two worlds – it fascinated me then, and still does today.’

Luna Zsigo self-expression
Luna Zsigo: Self-expression through art

For a while after her studies, Luna continued painting portraits using traditional methods, but she felt constrained. She found she was painting the kind of art that people might want to display on their walls, rather than using her art to express herself. However, through discussions with a fellow artist, that changed. Luna realised that she could work differently, putting all of herself into her art. ‘These conversations gave me permission to express myself fully through making a mark – just putting my pencil on the paper and letting it move and having no idea where it was going to go or what it was doing,’ she explains. ‘My partner, showed me a video about automatic drawing, featuring a comic book artist called Moebius. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jean_Giraud Moebius used it as a discipline in his work. I hadn’t heard of automatic drawing until then, but I realised that that was what I was doing.’

Years previously, Luna had been fascinated by an artist and mystic called Hilma af Klint https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hilma_af_Klint whose bold, colourful abstract paintings (1906-1915, but not exhibited until 1985, 50 years after her death) were generated through a process of automatic painting as part of her spiritual practice, and represented direct communication with the ‘divine’.

The pictures were painted directly through me, without any preliminary drawings, and with great force. I had no idea what the paintings were supposed to depict; nevertheless I worked swiftly and surely, without changing a single brush stroke – Hilma af Klint

Luna Zsigo: Primal Scream
Luna Zsigo: Primal Scream

‘Klint’s work stayed with me and I was really inspired by it,’ Luna recalls. ‘Throughout my life, I think I’ve learned to bury my difficult emotions – anger, hatred, jealousy, anxiety – but today if I am experiencing a difficult emotion and I don’t know what to do with it, I will just let the pencil move and as it moves I will just, very intuitively, go to the paints or the medium that I want to use and then all of a sudden, in front of me, I see things in the piece, the work starts to communicate with me, to tell a story.’

‘I believe that we all come from creation, therefore we must be creative and it is only the intellectual mind that gets in the way of that,’ she continues. ‘So if I allow the drawing just to form, with no expectation of what I’m going to draw, it’s a real freedom and I’m able to understand my own journey and express myself.’

Recently, Luna has tried to let go of everything she was taught about artistic technique to move completely into this new way of painting. ‘I wasn’t sure how it would be received by the public,’ she says. ‘But I was delighted to sell 20 paintings at a recent exhibition, so it seems that people connect to the work and it has some value.’

Luna Zsigo: Grandad portrait automatic drawing
Luna Zsigo: Grandad

Luna’s automatic drawings have different starting points. She still paints portraits but rather than focusing on a subject in front of her, or a photograph, she works from a remembered image, memories of the person, and the emotions associated with those memories. She draws a continuous line, with her eyes shut, to ‘bring the person through’. She also sometimes paints to music, allowing her hand to respond to the sounds she hears to form the final piece.

Luna Zsigo: Collaboration with Terry Lane 'The closer we are to death'
Luna Zsigo; Collaboration with Terry Lane

Luna recently collaborated with musician Terry Lane on his soundscape The closer we are to dying. ‘Some of Terry’s soundscapes were to do with war and through my automatic drawings I found myself going to a very dark places, not only visually but inside myself,’ Luna remembers. ‘I wondered what would happen if I repeated the same process with other types of music.’

Luna Zsigo: Painting to classical music
Luna Zsigo: Painting to classical music

Inspired by the synesthesia artists, Wassily Kandinsky https://www.tate.org.uk/art/artists/wassily-kandinsky-1382, Roy De Maistre https://www.tate.org.uk/art/artists/roy-de-maistre-1556, and Melissa McCracken https://mymodernmet.com/melissa-mccracken-synethesia-paintings/ who paints the ‘shape’ of music, Luna has produced pieces inspired by local musicians. ‘I went to see the City of Rochester Symphony Orchestra and I produced 4 or 5 drawings from that,’ she recalls. ‘They became paintings, and I couldn’t believe the imagery I got from that music.’

Luna Zsigo selfscape emotional journey
Luna Zsigo: Selfscape

 

Where automatic art tells a story of an emotional journey, Luna has coined the name ‘selfscape’. ‘It is a selfscape because it is a painting of my emotional landscape,’ she explains. ‘There was an initial thought behind the image on the left. When you are really frightened of doing something, there is a door. But then you push through that door and five other doors open. I feel that has been my journey, pushing through anxiety and self-doubt. As I do that, I move from dark to light, from anxiety to bliss and freedom. I push one door open and new doors appear, new opportunities arise, and so it goes on.’

Looking at the final painting, I said to Luna, ‘The journey from dark to light is powerful – but where are the doors?’
‘It was supposed to be doors but it ended up looking like a bridge!’ Luna laughs. ‘It doesn’t matter though, because it is a journey of self-discovery and you can name the artwork afterwards.’

Luna Zsigo: Explore and draw
Explore and draw

In 2017, Luna founded Explore and Draw https://www.lunazsigo.com/explore-and-draw/ an art group that  welcomes artists of all abilities to come together to create art. By collaborating with local businesses and heritage sites, Luna has facilitated workshops in stunning and interesting locations around Kent. Regular venues include Rochester Cathedral https://www.rochestercathedral.org/, Fort Luton https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fort_Luton The Copper Rivet Distillery https://www.copperrivetdistillery.com/ The Cheese Room https://www.thecheeseroomrochester.co.uk/ As part of a Meet the artist events, where the group collaborates with and learns from other artists across artistic disciplines and boundaries, I led a workshop earlier this year on LV21, on the Thames, in Gravesend. https://duncangrantartist.com/2019/03/20/drawing-inspiration-from-the-thames/.

Luna Zsigo: Guilt 3
Luna Zsigo: Guilt 3

Explore and Draw has well over one hundred participants and Luna is taking the group with her on a journey of self-discovery to explore their creativity through experimentation with materials and processes, such as automatic drawing. ‘I will continue to use still life at some events as it is a fantastic tool to show people  technique, such as mapping and measuring, colour theory and composition,’ she explains. ‘It is also a mindful activity. It helps people to relax, to learn to draw what is in front of them, to have fun and make friends. But I’m also interested in giving people the freedom to explore and to begin to put the whole of themselves into their art.’

I am always really conscious of the power of these emotions though, because working in this way has been such a painful process for me,’ she reflects. ‘So I’m always careful  to make these days fun and to create a safe space. And people are enjoying the process and find it fascinating.’

They group started their foray into the unconscious by painting with materials where they had less control than they would normally have with traditional brushwork. ‘We used Brusho crystal watercolour paints which explode on the paper like fireworks and you can find images in those marks,’ Luna explains. They then went on to paint with music, as Luna had done – she hired a string quartet to play while the group drew. Next year she is planning an automatic drawing workshop around vibration and sound, featuring a gong.’

Luna Zsigo: Thoughts
Thoughts

‘Life isn’t easy,’ Luna concludes. ‘Everyone has light and darkness in them and we all go through trauma at some point in our lives, so these paintings talk to people on lots of different levels. I can look at a painting and appreciate the artist’s technical ability but if I see a picture that stirs my emotion, that’s the picture I will remember. That’s the picture I want to buy.’

If you would like to hear from Luna herself, she is giving a public talk entitled Selfscapes for the Rochester and West Kent Art Society at Sun Pier House in Medway on 15th January 2020 from 7-9.30pm.

Tickets are also now available for the next Explore and draw – Lunar event at Rochester Cathedral in February 2020. The workshop will explore the ‘Museum of the Moon’ installation https://www.ticketsource.co.uk/whats-on/rochester/rochester-cathedral/explore/2020-02-19/10:30/t-jpzxgd And there are lots of other exciting events planned for 2020. More details will be announced on Luna’s website and Facebook page soon:
https://www.lunazsigo.com
https://www.facebook.com/exploreanddrawmedway/

You can also follow Luna on Instagram: artist.luna

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Celebrating the 50th Anniversary of Vigo RFC

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When I was a lad, before I went to college, and again during the 80s, I used to play rugby for Vigo RFC https://www.pitchero.com/clubs/vigorfc. I started out playing on the wing and then moved forward as I got older and slower.

Vigo RFC 50th anniversary book
Lineout at Sunset

Well, this year marks the Club’s 50th anniversary and to celebrate that they’ve brought out a limited edition book, charting the history of the club, edited by Trevor Newnham. I was delighted to be asked if I’d do some artwork for the book, based on old photographs. You can see one drawing on the cover, and three others inside.

The club, originally based at the Vigo Inn, near Fairseat in Kent, on the top of the North Downs, has an interesting history. This brief account is based on information from the 50th anniversary book and from Trevor’s article for the Stansted and Fairseat History Society https://stanstedhistory.org/groups-vigo-rfc/ Both contain some fascinating old images.

Rugby wasn’t always the game of choice at The Vigo Inn, formerly called The Upper Drover. Once upon a time, punters used to play ‘daddlums’ a form of table skittles. But everything changed one Sunday lunchtime in 1968 when a group of well-oiled local rugby players – regulars at the pub – came up with the idea that the field at the back of the pub would make a pretty good rugby pitch, and as such would offer ‘an ideal opportunity to combine beer and fitness’. Despite the field in question being ‘none too flat’ and more than somewhat muddy, their beer fuelled vision gradually turned into a plan. There were meetings, a committee and, in 1969, with telegraph poles as goalposts and a disused chicken shed to change in, Vigo RFC was founded. Lillian Ashwell, the pub’s landlady was elected as President – probably the first woman President of a rugby club in England.

Vigo RFC 50th anniversary
Tackle

A couple of players from nearby Gravesend RFC were persuaded to provide some coaching – a necessary first step as many of the prospective players had never touched a rugby ball before. But the team was enthusiastic and willing to learn and most players were soon judged to have ‘mastered basic rugby techniques’ and despite being ‘a little raw in one or two specialist positions, such as hooker’ were ready for fixtures with B teams from other clubs. In their first serious match, away to Deal in 1969, Vigo RFC recorded a ‘resounding’ 3-1 victory.

As the rugby became more serious, the club moved several times. Ten years on, it settled in current home at Swanswood in Harvel, not far fromthe original Vigo Inn.  A club member who was also a builder, supervised the construction of a clubhouse, with the players acting as labourers. And, over the years, through a number of fundraising initiatives, the clubhouse was improved and floodlights were installed.

Since then, the club has gone from strength to strength. It now fields four adult teams, a juniors team, and two junior mini-rugby teams.

Vigo RFC 50th anniversary
Try

As Trevor Newnham writes:
From the grassiest (and muddiest) of grassroots, the Club – Vigo RFC – came into being.  A pub side at heart, a determination to be independent of any brewer, professionalism, and a club that would offer a warm home to anyone who loves this great game.’

The 50th Anniversary Book: Vigo Rugby Football Club 1969-2019 is available now from the club at a cost of £10.

The originals of my drawings for the book and digital prints are available on my website. Just follow the links below:

 

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Launch day: My Liberty fabrics are now for sale!

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Well, what a day. Today I finally got to see the fabrics created from my winning #LibertyOpenCall design for sale on the shelves of Liberty! It was the first time seeing them for real. We only saw the strike offs when we visited the factory in Milan. The fabrics looks fantastic, brilliant quality and great colours. I have three colourway of one design ‘Duncan Grant’ on Tana Lawn and three of a second design ‘Small Town’ on silk.

 

 

 

 

 

 

To mark the launch, the store was decorated with panels of our fabrics and information about each of the four winners all the way up the stairs and around the Haberdashery Department.

We were treated to breakfast with the design and sales team and then signed copies of our original designs, which will go into the famous Liberty archive.

We each received 5metres of one of our fabrics – I chose the one closest to my original design in terms of colour, and then I couldn’t resist buying a metre of each of the others.

All six will make an appearance at my What a Liberty! exhibition at the Hot Tin from 18th May, if you want to see them and can’t make it to the store. https://duncangrantartist.com/event/exhibition-of-small-towns-to-coincide-with-liberty-london-open-call-launch/

As one part of the journey ends, another begins. We’ll be kept informed of how our fabrics are used. So if, say, a fashion house uses one of our designs of fabrics for a garment in their 2020 season collections, Liberty will tell us and will keep our names with the designs as far as they can.

Will let you know about any developments on here. Thanks to everyone who has encouraged me, voted for me and supported me so far.  One of you is getting a pair of designer boxers. You know who you are!

Here are the links to my fabrics on the Liberty website:

DUNCAN GRANT https://www.libertylondon.com/uk/search?q=duncan+grant

SMALL TOWN https://www.libertylondon.com/uk/search?q=small+town

Originals of my Small Town Ink Drawings and digital prints are available in my Gallery:

ORIGINALS https://duncangrantartist.com/product-category/original-artwork/drawing-ink/

PRINTS https://duncangrantartist.com/product-category/prints/ink-drawing/

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Liberty production process and sneak preview of ‘strike offs’

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Liberty have just sent through these photos from our visit to the factory, near Milan. Great shots of the commercial print process on a massive scale…

 

And here we are – me and the other three winners – with the print samples (strike-offs) that the design team had prepared so the Liberty buyers could make their selection of colourways for production. Chosen designs will be revealed at the launch at the Liberty store on 8th May 2019.

Here is Liberty’s official piece https://www.libertylondon.com/uk/features/design-and-living/opencall-printing-process-2019.html?numfromstart=NaN&referrer=content-hub-interiors

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Soundscapes

I wasn’t going to post again until after my visit to the Liberty factory in Italy, later this month but I wanted to share these short ‘soundscapes’ with you. They were made by talented Carlisle-based singer, songwriter and musician, Ian Kirton, using my pictures and his original music.

Ian played in numerous bands before developing an interest in music production. He now has over 10 years experience writing and recording music for film, television and video. Some of his tracks are available to license at https://www.audiosparx.com/IanKirton Links to the particular tracks featured on these videos are given below.

Ian also accepts original music commissions. If you think he can help you with your project you can contact him at ian.kirton@music2license.com

The videos are hosted on my You Tube channel https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCvRlRHLlLxHsgxUPplV2WDw/videos?view=0&sort=dd&shelf_id=1&view_as=subscriber 

All the artworked featured can be viewed or purchased from the Gallery on this site. Just enter the title into the search box.

Licences for the tracks used on these videos can be purchased here:
Coastal Scenes
Comminic8  https://www.audiosparx.com/sa/summary/play.cfm/crumb.31/crumc.0/sound_iid.941279
Small Towns 1
A Guiding Light https://www.audiosparx.com/sa/summary/play.cfm/crumb.31/crumc.0/sound_iid.941476
Small Towns 2
Pure Touch https://www.audiosparx.com/sa/summary/play.cfm/crumb.31/crumc.0/sound_iid.941284

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Liberty Open Call

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In September 2018, Liberty London, the designer department store, invited artists and designers to upload images of their work to Instagram using #LibertyOpenCall to compete for the chance to have that design used in Liberty fabrics. There were over 5,000 entries and, amazingly, I was selected as one of the four winners. You can see my design and those of the other winners here

https://www.libertylondon.com/uk/instore-pages/liberty-open-call.html

Earlier this month I was invited, along with the other winners to visit the iconic Liberty Store in London’s Regent Street to view the Liberty archive and work with Liberty designers to turn our images into fabric designs, to be featured in the Liberty summer collection 2019.

 

We had a great day. It was amazing how they can take bits of the design and make it work for different products. Liberty will print several test prints from each winner’s design and then their buyers will choose at least one from each artist to develop into Liberty fabric. Really exciting!

The next stage is a visit, later this month, to the Liberty fabric mill, near Milan, to watch our designs transformed into fabric.

HERE’S A SIMILAR PIECE FROM LIBERTY….with a little bit more information about what happens next.
https://www.libertylondon.com/uk/features/design-and-living/liberty-open-call-in-the-studio.html